Girls of slender means

The prime of miss jean brodie

As they realised themselves in varying degrees, few people alive at the time were more delightful, more ingenious, more movingly lovely, and, as it might happen, more savage, than the girls of slender means. I really enjoyed this novel with its cast of interesting, well-crafted characters. Is there a meaning in all this reading delight? To reread The Girls of Slender Means in is to appreciate the economy and brilliance of Spark's style. Her story is set in the direct aftermath of the Second World War, allowing for exceptions. Nicholas remembers crossing himself, involuntarily, when Selina reappears with the dress, and there is a suggestion that the gesture is in superstitious relief that she is safe. This was an innovative book in - not that I knew that then - and it still, today, flashes its own disguising Schiaparelli dress, with the beauty of youth pressed close against youth's bewilderment. Muriel Spark, an aloof, sharp-eyed Scotswoman, is such a writer, and her most noticeable characteristics are, of course, her wit, her absolute pitch in dialogue, her economy of style and her sedulous avoidance of sentiment. No one could quite believe it of him at the time. These elderly residents provide some nice comic moments in their interactions with one another, and in those with the younger residents of the club. The girls on this floor were not yet experienced in discussing men. He takes her to parties and poetry gatherings, introducing her to other writers in the process. For the young women of the novel, though, the time is critical; the crisis they face will become the black dot on their time line, a defining mark pointing to the good or bad luck they are about to suffer.

She is a lover of poetry, and her recitations of famous lines and stanzas are threaded through the novel adding an extra element of hilarity and interest.

Now decayed and shaky, its tall shabby rooms and its long windows with their newly replaced panes had a certain grandeur. Someone had recommended it, describing it to me as one of Spark's little "weirdies".

slender means meaning

That is a question of exact hip measurements, and the girls of slender hips have a definitive advantage compared to those who only are of slender means. While the timeline moves backwards and forwards throughout the novel, the majority of the action takes place over three months: the period between VE day in May and VJ Day in August The abrupt shifts in time are less easy to follow, and the verses she quotes with such poignant effect may not seem relevant to those who do not remember the context of the poems she quotes from as, for instance, "Gerard Manley Hopkins's "The Wreck of the Deutschland," in which one nun goes to her death unafraid.

Girls of slender means

Her story is set in the direct aftermath of the Second World War, allowing for exceptions. Rereading The Girls of Slender Means today is to pack away any befogging sense of "relatedness" and to see these young women freshly and separately.

The girls of slender means 1963

But neither Jane nor Selina was every to be aware that what Selina did in cold blood at the time of the May of Teck Club tragedy had determined Nicholas Farringdon's future and his fate. But, of course, I had already read it - back in the early 60s when it was first published. I was so occupied with "relating" and responding to the peppery prose that I missed the careful clues and warnings, especially those thrown off from Joanna's elocutionary exercises, snippets of poetry which ripple through the book like propitiating music. In the hope of building on this positive experience, I recently turned to another of her early works, the wonderfully titled The Girls of Slender Means. They quarrelled and reconciled, much as we had done, and worked on their poise and dabbled in danger and took turns wearing a gorgeous Schiaparelli dress that one of the girls had inherited from an aunt. But those who seek new dimensions in their reading will find this to be Miss Spark's most interesting piece of work. This storyline is told in a strange mix of flashbacks and future gossip.

With a line-up of new books waiting to be consumed - books piled on my desk, on my bedside table, on the floor of my office - I thought it wasteful to reread an old book. Farringdon had been at the time they knew him, an unsung poet with anarchic ideas about society.

His death in serves as the frame for the flashbacks to which make up the bulk of the novel. The Girls of Slender Means recalls a distant summer of wartime shortages, when the girls bartered soap, chocolate and evenings in the one Schiaparelli dress they shared.

No one at the May of Teck Club took this seriously as he looked quite normal; that is to say, he looked slightly dissipated, like the disappointing son of a good English family that he was.

Muriel spark

Posted by. Although the girls sometimes damned it as a "hostel" in their darker moods, they really rather liked it and enjoyed showing their guests both the house and the garden behind where a wartime bomb had burst, and where another--according to an aging spinster who had been in the house at the time--lay unexploded. The novel begins in with the discovery of the death of anarchist-turned-priest Nicholas Farringdon by gossip columnist, and former May of Tek resident, Jane Wright. Finally, the most attractive, sophisticated and lively girls are to be found on the top floor of the house, typically those with interesting jobs or lovers, and active social lives to boot. Furthermore, Joanna Childe's death is doubly tragic in that her bibulous clerical father, when called to London after the accident, is not quite grief-stricken enough. These might add up to dryness, but in Miss Spark's work, they do not. The Girls of Slender Means recalls a distant summer of wartime shortages, when the girls bartered soap, chocolate and evenings in the one Schiaparelli dress they shared. In the hope of building on this positive experience, I recently turned to another of her early works, the wonderfully titled The Girls of Slender Means. The Girls of Slender Means By Muriel Spark n a day when so many writers seem to write so much alike, it is a delight to discover one who writes like no one except herself. No one could quite believe it of him at the time. This building--converted long ago from a private establishment to a home for "Ladies of Slender Means" below the age of 30 who had to live away from their families in order to "follow an Occupation"--was still serving its purpose. I almost certainly would have read a hardcover edition from the public library, since I did not buy books in those lean years, and the library had not yet begun to stock paperbacks. However important Farringdon is to the story's meaning, it is the girls at the club with their twitterings and drives and escapades who pre-empt the stage.

The girls on this floor were not yet experienced in discussing men.

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The prime of Miss Muriel Spark