A literary analysis of the prologue in the canterbury tales by geoffrey chaucer

Included in this group are the Merchant, who illegally made much of his money from selling French coins a practice that was forbidden in England at the time ; the Sergeant of Law, who made his fortune by using his knowledge as a lawyer to buy up foreclosed property for practically nothing; the Clerk, who belongs with this group of pilgrims because of his gentle manners and extensive knowledge of books; and the Franklin, who made enough money to become a country gentleman and is in a position to push for a noble station.

canterbury tales line by line explanation

The Clerk follows the Merchant. His view of corrupt societies and how things "may not always be as they seem" was incredibly accurate and has even carried over its accuracy into the modern era. Buy Study Guide "When April comes with his sweet, fragrant showers, which pierce the dry ground of March, and bathe every root of every plant in sweet liquid, then people desire to go on pilgrimages.

First presented in this group is the Cook, whom we might consider out of place — ranked too high — but who, as a master of his trade, is greatly respected by his fellow travelers. Madonna is saying that she can do what she wants and that should be okay, no matter what society says.

Prologue to the canterbury tales summary pdf

He sings, writes, plays flutes, maintains his physical appearance, and burns with a passion that keeps him awake. The Wife of Bath is so adept at making cloth that she surpasses even the cloth-making capitals of Chaucer's world, Ypres and Ghent, and she wears coverchiefs linen coverings for the head which must the narrator assumes have 'weyeden ten pound'. A good religious man, A Parson of a Town, is next described, who, although poor in goods, is rich in holy thought and work. That evening, a group of people arrive at the inn, all of whom are also going to Canterbury to receive the blessings of "the holy blissful martyr," St. A Doctor of Medicine is the next pilgrim described, clad in red and blue, and no-one in the world can match him in speaking about medicine and surgery. A middle-class group of pilgrims comprises the next lower position of social rank. Before continuing the tale, the narrator declares his intent to list and describe each of the members of the group. Most of the pilgrims are guildsmen, members of a specific trade. His writings are highly controversial and bring out the faults in the most conservative aspects of society—especially when it comes to sexism and the church. Yet before the narrator goes any further in the tale, he describes the circumstances and the social rank of each pilgrim. Thus all of the information might be seen to operate on various levels. Sometimes this is presented blatantly. He has spoken and met with these people, but he has waited a certain length of time before sitting down and describing them.

The Host welcomes everyone to the inn, and announces the pilgrimage to Canterbury, and decides that, on the way there, the company shall 'talen and pleye' to tell stories and amuse themselves. That night, the group slept at the Tabard, and woke up early the next morning to set off on their journey.

Canterbury tales prologue worksheet answers

He is extremely well beloved of franklins landowners and worthy women all over the town. He then makes an important statement of intent for what is to come: he who repeats a tale told by another man, the narrator says, must repeat it as closely as he possibly can to the original teller - and thus, if the tellers use obscene language, it is not our narrator's fault. At the beginning of Chaucer 's collection of stories, he describes each of the pilgrims. The Cook could roast and simmer and boil and fry, make stews and hashes and bake a pie well, but it was a great pity that, on his shin, he has an ulcer. Chaucer presents how competition can quickly turn a friend into an enemy. Some members of the pilgrim group are also rivaling like the Miller and the Reeve. A good religious man, A Parson of a Town, is next described, who, although poor in goods, is rich in holy thought and work. Larry D. Madonna is saying that she can do what she wants and that should be okay, no matter what society says. But then, Chaucer implies, there are no honest millers. In the fourteenth century, Madonna would be seen as a rebellious person that no one should follow

He only has a little gold, which he tends to spend on books and learning, and takes huge care and attention of his studies. In contrastthe Parson, a clergyman, acts and behaves keeping in mind his class and duties.

None of them tell a tale.

Canterbury tales prologue modern english

His shape is called 'the Maudelayne'. These contrasting themes are an integral part of the complexity and sophistication of the book, as they provide for an ironic dichotomy to the creative plot development and undermine the superficial assumptions that might be made. A noble Manciple a business agent, purchaser of religious provisions is the next pilgrim to be described, and a savvy financial operator. Most characters lie about their social status to maintain their respect. It serves as an essential ingredient that makes a story appealing and persuasive. Therefore, judgment plays an active role in most of the tales. He is extremely well beloved of franklins landowners and worthy women all over the town. Analysis The General Prologue was probably written early in the composition of the Canterbury Tales, and offers an interesting comparison point to many of the individual tales itself. There are also fair and straight edge people, as well as people who have a bit more of a wild side, just like one might see at a rock concert He is big-boned and has big muscles, and always wins the prize in wrestling matches. This is no bookish monk, studying in a cloister, but a man who keeps greyhounds to hunt the hare. It is through these characters; he foreshadows the importance of status in medieval society. Everyone consents to the Host's plan for the game, and he then goes on to set it out.
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SparkNotes: The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue: Introduction